young-storm-500x255Storm has been many things in her storied career:  thief, goddess, superhero, leader, queen, and even sorceress (although the latter was an alternate timeline version of her; see the Magik miniseries for more).  Many a comic has explored Ororo’s life as an X-Man, but ever since Chris Claremont told her origin story in Uncanny X-Men #102 (and further explored her childhood on the streets of Cairo in #117), there has existed a precedent to mine the stories from Storm’s past.  Perhaps it is simply a fascination to delve into the humble beginnings of a character destined for greatness.  I think it’s important to note that the “All-New, All-Different” Uncanny X-Men were already adults when they joined the team unlike the original 5 members, and I think that made their backstories much more fascinating, adding mystery to the characters (especially Wolverine, who’s past was a secret for a very long time).

Speaking of Wolverine, the image above is a scene from Wolverine: Origins featuring Storm as a child.  It was cut from the final movie and has been rumored to be included with the extras when it is released on DVD.  I’m curious to see what the scene was about, but not anxious to have to see that movie again *sigh*. 

uncanny 266Chris Claremont de-aged Storm in a story involving Nanny and the Orphanmaker.  Storm escaped, but was still a youth and began to live her life as a thief again (but this time, instead of Cairo, Egypt she was was in Cairo, Illinois).  She later was returned to adulthood in Uncanny X-Men #272 during the X-tinction Agenda crossover.  The above image is Gambit’s first appearance and is drawn by Andy Kubert.

ORORO003The Ororo: Before the Storm 4 issue mini-series (cover by Patrick Zircher) also went back in time for stories about Storm’s past.  I chose this cover to share because I love the Egyptian hieroglyphics on the wall behind ‘lil Ororo.  It’s so iconic and a great storytelling device!

805368-85_x_men_forever_6_superIn recent issues of X-Men Forever, X-Scribe Chris Claremont is revisiting the concept of young Storm.  X-Men Forever is a title that grants Claremont an alternate timeline of the X-Men Universe as if the writer never left (picking up fresh from X-Men #3).  I found some annotations of X-Men Forever #4 here that I found interesting.  I appreciate all the work that Paul Steven Brown puts into his articles about the title.  The above image is by Tom Grummett

I’m interested in seeing where Claremont takes this storyline.  What do you think, dear reader? Do you like reading about young Storm? Or would you rather see stories that delve into the modern woman a la X-Men Worlds Apart by Chris Yost?  I’m thinking we’re getting the best of (literally) both worlds since Claremont can write about both the young and the older Storm in his title (and yes, that is a kind of spoiler, sorry; but at least I didn’t tell you why the older one is not a Storm I can really get behind, although I love reading about her;  you can read the title and see for yourself) and then we can read about Storm in the regular Marvel Universe (although her appearances these days in Uncanny X-MenBlack Panther are spotty at best (I suppose I should be grateful for that one panel of Storm watching the news about her team whole she sits at T’Challa’s hospital bed), but I do love Warren Ellis’ take on her in Astonishing X-Men).  Oh yeah, and there’s Marvel Adventures Avengers where Storm is actually an engaging respected member of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes!  So, there’s a lot of Storm but also not enough (at least not in a cohesive,, scene stealing, centerstage way).  It’s confounding!  I’ll end this post by simply giving thanks that there’s this much to talk about!  Let me know what you think in the comments below!